Parents should be excited when they welcome a new child into the world. But in order for that happiness to come into fruition, doctors must safely deliver the baby. Failing to follow proper procedures and failing to properly monitor an expecting mother’s condition can be disastrous for both the unborn child and the mother. Children born in these situations may suffer serious injuries including permanent disability, and mothers may also be irreparably harmed.

When one of these instances happened to a family in 2009, they filed a medical malpractice lawsuit. There, a child suffered spastic quadriplegic cerebral palsy after nurses failed to alert the mother’s doctor about a drastic change in the baby’s heart rate during labor. The 13-minute delay caused serious, irreparable brain damage to the child. The jury agreed with the family, finding the nurses were liable for their negligence and ordering them to pay nearly $33 million in damages.

Caring for a child’s birth injury can be physically, emotionally and financially taxing. The child may have to cope with life-long pain while he or she and the family must come to the realization that the child may never live a normal life. Also, medical and rehabilitative care for such injuries can be costly, threatening to throw a family into financial disarray.

In an effort to ease pain and suffering and recover economic losses, a family can file a medical malpractice lawsuit against the medical professionals responsible for the injuries. A Massachusetts attorney well-versed in this area of law can sit with a family to clarify the process and discuss the likelihood of success. If a the claim moves forward, then the attorney can seek to negotiate a settlement, thereby avoiding a lengthy trial. If the case does go to trial, then the attorney will present all supportive evidence in an effort to recover compensation for medical expenses, lost wages, pain and suffering and other damages.

Source: The Daily Local News, “Phoenixville Hospital hit with $32M negligence verdict after girl born with brain damage,” Michael P. Rellahan, Jan. 22, 2013